Farmers' Blog

Field Report

What's New?
Posted 10/16/2016 7:15am by Andre Cantelmo.

 
The entire crew of Heron Pond Farm would like to thank you for your support this summer. Being a CSA member is making a choice to get more involved with your local food system. You made a commitment to us and your commitment has helped us to further our goal of becoming better farmers. You have given us the security we need to be better stewards to the land, and better members of the community.

This year we improved our irrigation system out of necessity and are better prepared for what the future holds. We, with the help of a number of community groups, found a home for so many seconds and fed to many folks to count. We have begun to see real improvement in our soils through the practices we have been investing in over time, practices that your membership has helped to make possible. The CSA has become to back bone of Heron Pond Farm’s cash flow that has allowed us to maintain a crew of six full time farmers. The ability to have consistency in our crew has helped us to create a more sustainable farming system that we all get to enjoy.

We hope you have enjoyed your summer with us. We know we have enjoyed having you. Many of you will be joining us next week for the start of the Winter CSA. For those of you that are not, we hope to see you again next year, and thank you again.

It would be a great help if you could help us improve our CSA. Please cut and past the questions below and follow this link: Building a better CSA. This email will be sent to everyone involved in making your CSA happen. They will use this information to make next year CSA even better.

What was your favorite thing about Heron Pond Farm CSA?

What is the one thing you would change about Heron Pond Farm’s CSA if you could?

Thanks again for taking the time.
 
See you this week!
Locally yours,
Andre 
Time to sign up for Winter CSA!
 
We still have just a few spots left in the Winter CSA. We can not go over 200. Traditionally this is a big week for last minuet sign ups so do not delay: We have 5 share left at the farm stand, 3 left in Portsmouth, 6 left in Dover. 

Sign up today on our website or at the farm stand or at one of our Farmer’s Market booths.

NEW! Partial share! Due to your requests we are now offering smaller sized share, all the greens that you get in a full share but lighter on the roots and storage crops.

Full Share: The full share is great if you cook most of your meals at home. You can see on our website photos and a week by week list of what our shareholders got last winter under the CSA tab, click on “What’s in a winter share

 
We can almost taste the cheese!

Heron Pond Farmers gave a hand moving the cheese vat into it's new home. All of the equipment is here and we're attending to the final details. You'll be able to find Bell & Goose Cheese this Holiday Season in our farm stand.
 

Hasselback potatoes

 

These garlicky Hasselback roasted potatoes are a great side dish. They have a crunchy top with a delicious garlic and rosemary flavor.


Ingredients

  • 8 potatoes (we used Nadine variety)
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 tbsp fresh rosemary, roughly chopped
  • salt and pepper

 

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 200°C fan-forced. Line a baking tray with baking paper and set aside.
  2. Cut potatoes into thin slices, without cutting entirely through the slice to separate.Mix the oil with the garlic and brush into the spaces in the potatoes.
  3. Sprinkle with rosemary and salt and pepper.
  4. Bake for 45 minutes.

notes

  • If you place an old chopstick on either side of the potato it will stop the knife cutting all the way through the potato.
  • I like to make sure the garlic is crushed well and sometimes I even grind it in a mortar and pestle with the oil so it releases its full flavor.
  • Be generous with the salt and pepper and try to use freshly ground as it gives the best flavor.

Thank you Sarah George! Be sure to check out her site!
Last Summer Share

Remember this shot? 

Tomatoes are back in the share this week and they might make an appearance in the winter CSA if the temps hold up. This is summer shares last pickup so we included a nice amount of beans. They freeze well if you can’t get through them. They are also likely in the first winter share.
CSA Share 10/16/16
                        Full                        Half
Lettuce             1                            1
Beans               2                            1
Potatoes           2                            1
Apples              3                            2
Carrots             1                          1/2
Carmen            2                            1
Onions             3                             2
Bell Peppers    2                              1
Kale or Chard  1                             1
Winter Squash  1                             1
Tomatoes            2                           1

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Posted 10/9/2016 7:04am by Andre Cantelmo.

The Seeding Never Stops


Two more shares left in the summer season. I must say that despite the drought I think things came together for us this year. We would love for you to rate your share. It helps us build a better CSA for everyone.

We continue to prep for the winter season.This week more seeding and planting. The whole time we are bringing in the storage crops. It's a great time of year and the bounty in the share and farm stand shows it.

Enjoy!
 
See you this week!
Locally yours,
Andre 
Time to sign up for Winter CSA!
 
If you have not signed up yet, you still have time. Check out the links below.

Sign up today on our website or at the farm stand or at one of our Farmer’s Market booths.

NEW! Partial share! Due to your requests we are now offering smaller sized share, all the greens that you get in a full share but lighter on the roots and storage crops.

Full Share: The full share is great if you cook most of your meals at home. You can see on our website photos and a week by week list of what our shareholders got last winter under the CSA tab, click on “What’s in a winter share
 
 

Parmesan Chicken With Caesar Roasted Romaine

Not only is this entire Parmesan chicken recipe in one pan—it comes with a built-in side dish of roasted romaine. Skeptical about roasted greens? Try it, and you'll be a convert.


Ingredients

SERVINGS: 4
  • 4 7-ounce skinless, boneless chicken breasts
  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan, Pecorino, or Asiago cheese (about 1 1/2 ounces)
  • 1/2 cup panko (Japanese breadcrumbs)
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 2 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 2 garlic cloves, chopped, divided
  • 2 large hearts of romaine, halved lengthwise
  • 4 anchovy fillets packed in oil, drained, chopped
  • 1 lemon, cut into 8 wedges

 

Preparation

PREP: 10 MINTOTAL: 20 MIN
  • Preheat oven to 450°. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with foil. Season chicken with salt and pepper; place on prepared sheet. Combine cheese, panko, 2 Tbsp. oil, parsley, and 1 garlic clove in a medium bowl; season with salt and pepper. Pat panko mixture onto breasts. Roast chicken until crumbs begin to turn golden, about 10 minutes.
  • Drizzle romaine with 1 Tbsp. oil and sprinkle with remaining 1 chopped garlic clove. Season with salt and pepper. Remove sheet from oven; place romaine around chicken. Roast until chicken is cooked through and lettuce is browned at edges, about 5 minutes. Divide among plates. Top lettuce with anchovies; garnish with lemon wedges for squeezing over.

 


Thank you Sarah George! Be sure to check out her site!
We can almost taste the cheese!

Heron Pond Farmers gave a hand moving the cheese vat into it's new home. All of the equipment is here and we're attending to the final details. You'll be able to find Bell & Goose Cheese this Holiday Season in our farm stand.

CSA Share 10/9/16
                        Full                        Half
Lettuce             2                            1
Beans               1                           1/2
Potatoes           1                            1/2
Apples              3                            2
Carrots             2                            1
Carmen            2                            1
Onions             3                             2
Bell Peppers    1                              1
Kale or Chard  1                             1
Winter Squash  1                             1
Broccoli               1                           1/2

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Posted 10/2/2016 7:44am by Andre Cantelmo.

                                                      

Carmen Peppers also know as Sweet Italian Frying Peppers.

These things are incredible roasted or fried.

This is our first year trying the yellow kind but we feel they are just as amazing.

We have waited all season for a rain like this and it is helping us out for sure.

Not only are ponds and ground water

This week we get to feast on  getting replenished,

but our fall carrots and Brussels sprouts are getting much needed moister. 

Thank you for your support signing up our Winter Share.

You will being to see adds for our remaining shares starting this week.

Because of your support we only have 6 shares left in Portsmouth, 9 shares in Dover,

and 19 at our home base, the farm stand in South Hampton.

Because of you, it looks like we will meet our goal of 200 members. Thanks again!

See you this week!
Locally yours,
Andre 

Time to sign up for Winter CSA!
 
If you have not signed up yet, you still have time. Check out the links below.

Sign up today on our website or at the farm stand or at one of our Farmer’s Market booths.

NEW! Partial share! Due to your requests we are now offering smaller sized share, all the greens that you get in a full share but lighter on the roots and storage crops.

Full Share: The full share is great if you cook most of your meals at home. You can see on our website photos and a week by week list of what our shareholders got last winter under the CSA tab, click on “What’s in a winter share
 
 

Fried Sweet Peppers With Balsamic Vinegar

Yield: Serves 6 Prep Time: 10 mins Cook Time: 15 mins

This easy side dish is delicious served along with roasted meats or sausages.  

Ingredients:

6 Large Sweet Peppers (I Used 2 Yellow, 4 Red)
1/3 Cup Extra Virgin Olive OIl
2 Garlic Cloves, Peeled & Minced
1/3 Cup Balsamic Vinegar
Salt & Pepper
1/3 Cup Fresh Chopped Parsley

Directions:

Wash and dry the peppers, then remove the seeds, stems, and membranes.
Cut the peppers into 1 inch strips.
Heat the oil in a large heavy bottomed skillet and add the peppers, stirring well to coat in the oil.
Cook the peppers over medium heat until they begin to soften and brown, stirring often, about 10 minutes.
Add the garlic and cook another minute or two until fragrant.
Add the balsamic vinegar, season with salt and pepper and mix well.
Cook another 3 to 4 minutes until the peppers have absorbed all of the vinegar.
Toss with the fresh chopped parsley and place on a platter to serve.

 


Thank you Sarah George! Be sure to check out her site!
Don’t miss Sarah’s online Fall Cleanse Program, loaded with delicious seasonal recipes! 
This step-by-step program will give you all the tools you need to cleanse in a safe and natural way so you can feel lighter, clearer and full of energy. 
Click HERE to learn more. 

CSA Share 9/18/16
                        Full                        Half
Lettuce             2                            1
Beets                 1                           1/2
Potatoes           2                            1
Mellon              1                        small 1
Carrots             1                           1/2
Carmen            3                            2
Onions             3                             2
Bell Peppers    1            Choice/Eggplant
Eggplant          2        Choice/Bell Pepper 
Kale or Chard  1                             1
Winter Squash  1                             1
Broccoli               1                           1/2
 
 

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Posted 9/25/2016 10:38am by Andre Cantelmo.

It seems that the calendar and the weather are in tune this week.

As the first days of fall set in the cool weather

has us in sweatshirts for our morning meeting.

This is great working weather and the crew has been

stepping up to the plate.

Winter squash is being wind-rowed, winter greens planted,

and this week we all get to share in the first of the fall broccoli. 

It is time for us to clean out our store rooms

and start the push towards bringing in

winter food. We start with potatoes

and normally finish with carrots

picking up many of your other favorites along the way. 


See you this week!


Locally yours,


Andre 

Time to sign up for Winter CSA!
The cool has set in this week, allowing our winter foods to start to get that
sweet flavor we all love. With three weeks left in the summer share
it is time to turn our thoughts towards what kind of nest will we have for winter.
Hope you will join us in the cozy one we are building.

On the farm we are busy making sure you will have that food in the colder months ahead.
The goal of Community Supported Agriculture is to get money to farms when they need it most,
at the beginning of a season.
The winter share is a little different, by the time we are signing you up
most of the labor and money has been spent getting the food in the ground.
This year we have been hit hard by the drought.
Every vegetable we sell costs us more to produce
because of the labor and money it takes to move water. 
We are asking that if possible when you sign up for the winter share you
consider paying in full right away.

As you’ve seen this summer in the farm stand,
despite the drought and tight budget our produce quality and variety has been great
if we do say so ourselves. The winter share will be no different.
Our winter crops are looking great in the field!

Sign up today on our website or at the farm stand
or at one of our Farmer’s Market booths.

NEW! Partial share!
Due to your requests we are now offering smaller sized share,
all the greens that you get in a full share but lighter on the roots and storage crops.

Full Share: 
The full share is great if you cook most of your meals at home.
You can see on our website photos and a week by week list
of what our shareholders got last winter under the CSA tab,
 
 

Spiced Sweet Potato And Roasted Broccoli Toasts

 

The broccoli can be cooked early in the day, but toast the bread just before assembling so it doesn’t dry out.

Preparation

Sweet Potato Mash

  • Combine sweet potato, chile (if using), orange juice, and 1 cup water in a small saucepan; season with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer until sweet potato is very soft and liquid has evaporated, 20–25 minutes. Remove from heat and mash. Let cool slightly.
  • Do Ahead: Sweet potato mash can be made 3 days ahead. Cover and chill.

Broccoli And Assembly

  • Preheat oven to 425°. Toss broccoli and 2 Tbsp. oil on a rimmed baking sheet; season with salt and pepper. Roast until tender, 15–20 minutes. Let cool, then coarsely chop.
  • Meanwhile, brush both sides of bread with 2 Tbsp. oil total and toast on a baking sheet until golden brown, 6–8 minutes.
  • Toss broccoli, nuts, lemon juice, half of basil and mint, and remaining 4 Tbsp. oil in a large bowl; season with salt and pepper.
  • Spread toasts with sweet potato, top with broccoli mixture and remaining basil and mint, and sprinkle with sea salt. Cut into pieces.
  • Recipe by Dan Kluger
  • Photograph by William Abranowicz

Thank you Sarah George! Be sure to check out her site!
Don’t miss Sarah’s online Fall Cleanse Program, loaded with delicious seasonal recipes! 
This step-by-step program will give you all the tools you need to cleanse in a safe and natural way so you can feel lighter, clearer and full of energy. 
Click HERE to learn more. 

CSA Share 9/18/16
                        
 

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Posted 9/18/2016 6:33am by Andre Cantelmo.

Just when other places are winding down with the summer season crops we go for round two with tomatoes and cucumbers. As you can see these tomatoes are growing well and just starting to ripen. This is one of two, four hundred foot tunnels that we have set up for fall harvest. We also turned one of our summer high tunnels around from early spring tomatoes to late fall cucumbers. We will be picking these before our summer share ends but still be picking for the beginning of our winter share.

This week we covered the last bay of the field tunnels, you can check out the view below. Water mellon have been coming out of the field by the bin, and the winter squash are being wind rowed. Next week I will try to include a photo of the best stand of carrots I have ever seen. Stay tuned.

See you this week!
Locally yours,
Andre 
Time to sign up for Winter CSA!
Sun is rising on fall. This is the last weekend of summer and it is time to think about building our nest for the winter.  The winter CSA is halfway filled. We only have 200 shares and cannot expand it due to the inclusion of frozen items and deep winter greens. There is always a rush to register the last week of the summer share but this year there is a good chance that we will be full by then. Please register soon so you don’t miss out.

It’s hard to think about hearty soups and the smell of roasted dinners filling the house when it’s 90 degrees outside but on the farm we are busy making sure you will have that food in the colder months ahead. The goal of Community Supported Agriculture is to get money to farms when they need it most, at the beginning of a season. The winter share is a little different, by the time we are signing you up most of the labor and money has been spent getting the food in the ground. This year we have been hit hard by the drought. Every vegetable we sell costs us more to produce because of the labor and money it takes to move water. We are asking that if possible when you sign up for the winter share you consider paying in full right away.

As you’ve seen this summer in the farm stand, despite the drought and tight budget our produce quality and variety has been great if we do say so ourselves. The winter share will be no different. Our winter crops are looking great in the field!

Sign up today on our website or at the farm stand or at one of our Farmer’s Market booths.

NEW! Partial share! Due to your requests we are now offering smaller sized share, all the greens that you get in a full share but lighter on the roots and storage crops.

Full Share: The full share is great if you cook most of your meals at home. You can see on our website photos and a week by week list of what our shareholders got last winter under the CSA tab, click on “What’s in a winter share

 

WATERMELON FRESH
Serves 2

 

4 cups chopped watermelon
1 tomato, chopped
1 cup baby spinach or mixed greens
4 to 6 basil leaves, chopped
2 tablespoons pumpkin seeds
1 lime, juiced
1 tablespoon olive oil
½ cup crumbled feta cheese, if desired
 
Combine watermelon, tomato, greens, basil and pumpkin seeds.
Whisk the olive oil and lime juice together and drizzle over salad.
Top with feta, if desired.
 


Thank you Sarah George! Be sure to check out her site!
Don’t miss Sarah’s online Fall Cleanse Program, loaded with delicious seasonal recipes! 
This step-by-step program will give you all the tools you need to cleanse in a safe and natural way so you can feel lighter, clearer and full of energy. 
Click HERE to learn more. 

CSA Share 9/18/16
                        Full                        Half
Lettuce             1                             1
Greens              1                             
Tomatoes         2                            1
Mellon              1                        small 1
Carrots             1                           1/2
Carmen            1                   
Onions             3                             2
Bell Peppers    1                             1
Eggplant          2                             1
Kale or Chard  1                             1
Acorn Squash  1                             1
 
 

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Posted 9/11/2016 8:24am by Andre Cantelmo.

 

Each year we donate tons of food to area food pantries. Seacoast Families is one of our bigger partners giving lots of food for their kids program. We also have been donating to the Boston Gleaners. The Gleaner program is great for the farm and for the pantry. After we have gotten all we think we can out of a field, the gleaners come in and clean it out. This year we just slipped into the top ten farms that contribute to the project. Check out the list below. Feel free to check out what these folks are doing and pass along the information to anyone that you think might be able to help.

See you this week!
Locally yours,
Andre 
 
SUMMER FARMER NEWSLETTER
All the Gleaning Information You Need to Know
 
Dear Partner Farm,
 
Welcome to the first edition of our farmer newsletter, where we plan to keep you informed about updates to our Gleaning Program, and to remind you of the many
services we offer to farmers. See what's going on in our world below!
 
https://ci4.googleusercontent.com/proxy/PwY8zeozY2N-IcCD2_ylKeRnWztoJgQEUzy1x6UO5C_9NWN4oAhHKJ3ziNyVXtXzsh48LD_Qj7IQWN4G7uMz3tQ4Q4L_qdkUhbASv83bqT-i=s0-d-e1-ft#https://imgssl.constantcontact.com/letters/images/sys/S.gif  
https://ci4.googleusercontent.com/proxy/PwY8zeozY2N-IcCD2_ylKeRnWztoJgQEUzy1x6UO5C_9NWN4oAhHKJ3ziNyVXtXzsh48LD_Qj7IQWN4G7uMz3tQ4Q4L_qdkUhbASv83bqT-i=s0-d-e1-ft#https://imgssl.constantcontact.com/letters/images/sys/S.gif Charlotte Border, 2016 Seasonal Gleaning Coordinator
  • If you haven't already met her, Charlotte Border is our Seasonal Gleaning Coordinator for 2016. Click here to learn more about Charlotte.
    • Dylan is now our Gleaning Program Manager. He will continue to be out in the fields and will be your main contact for crop donations.
    • Matt is now our Distribution Program Manager. He coordinates the distribution of crops to our partner hunger relief agencies, and he still occasionally works in the fields.
  • Click here to learn about the new federal tax deduction for farms that donate produce to nonprofits like the Gleaners.
  • We are accepting donations of cosmetically drought-stressed crops such as dry-tip corn and small apples.
  • We have implemented a new Food Safety plan to ensure that the produce you donate to us remains high quality until it reaches peoples' plates.  Ask one of our staff members if you'd like to learn more about what we are doing!
 
Top 10 Donating Farms this Growing Season
(June 1 2016 - September 7 2016)
 
  1. Farmer Dave's (Dracut): 41,073 lbs. (845 bushels)
  2. Kimball Fruit Farm (Pepperell): 17,139 lbs. (644 bushels)
  3. Brooksby Farm (Peabody): 13,850 lbs. (360 bushels)
  4. Applefield Farm (Stow): 10,947 lbs. (590 bushels)
  5. The Food Project (Lincoln): 10,321 lbs. (300 bushels)
  6. Ward's Berry Farm (Sharon): 5,220 lbs. (174 bushels)
  7. Siena Farms (Sudbury): 4634 lbs. (178 bushels)
  8. Land's Sake Farm (Weston): 2,700 lbs. (54 bushels)
  9. Appleton Farms (Ipswich): 2,516 lbs. (84 bushels)
  10. Heron Pond Farm (S. Hampton, NH): 2,265 lbs. (122 bushels)

HUMMUS RATATOUILLE

 

1 onion
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 eggplant              
2 medium zucchinis
2 meduim yellow squash (or 2 additional zucchinis)
2 cups tomatoes
¼ cup olive oil
1-2 teaspoons thyme
1-2 teaspoons basil
Sea salt and black pepper to taste
1-2 teaspoons smoky seasoning, such as smoked paprika, Cajun or chipotle
1 cup hummus (1/4 cup per serving)
Diced green, red and/or yellow peppers (optional)
 

  • Finely chop onions and mince garlic
  • Cut the eggplant, zucchini and squash into 1” cubes
  • Dice tomatoes to medium pieces
  • Heat olive oil in large, deep skillet
  • Add in onions and stir occasionally for 3 minutes
  • Add garlic and continue cooking for 3 minutes, until onions are semi-translucent
  • Add eggplant and continue to stir and cook on medium high for about 5 minutes, until eggplant is starting to get soft
  • Add thyme, basil, zucchini and squash, and chopped peppers (if desired)
  • Cook about 5 more minutes on medium high, stirring occasionally so veggies cook evenly
  • Add tomatoes
  • Stir to evenly distribute
  • Add lots of pepper and smoky seasoning and cook for about 3 more minutes or until tomatoes are done. Salt to taste
  • Top each serving with hummus and sprinkle with fresh herbs (if desired)

Thank you Sarah George! Be sure to check out her site!
Last minute addition! Watermelons!
We have a great crop of melons to share with you this week. When you consider the drought we have been having these melons are something to behold. We grow two types of melons. Sugar Babies are a watermelon bred right here in New Hampshire. They are a very old type bred for flavor. Greg also picked out a seedless type that comes close on flavor without seeds. No seeds might be a good idea but sometimes these melons are not as nice in flavor. Melons are hard to pick so sometimes a not so ripe one sneaks through. You can tell the seedless by the tiger like strips on them.

We have two sizes of melon as well. We ask that have shares please take the smaller more personal size melons and that the full share take the larger ones.

Click on image to see full size

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Posted 9/4/2016 6:24am by Andre Cantelmo.

Storms a coming!

Special note. This week the Dover pick up will be on Tuesday instead of Monday. See you there!

Normally when there is a storm coming we all get a bit nervous here on the farm. Funny to say that we are all looking forward to some clouds and rain on Labor Day. While we hope it does not mess up your holiday plans to much, the plants would enjoy a nice drink. Latest forecast don’t have the storm amounting to much but that could change.

There is no happiness quite like listening to the rain hit the medal roof of a barn after a long dry spell. Say little prayer, wiggle your toes, jump up and down three times, whatever your rain dance may be. Let’s see if we can make a bunch of farmers happy.

Meantime the amazing crew of Heron Pond Farm keeps making the food happen. September is one of the finest months for food and you will see the diversity continue to rise in the farm stand and CSA shares. September is the month that we still have all the great food of summer, but get to add some of folks favorite fall comfort foods.


See you this week!
Locally yours,
Andre 

 

Eggplant Caviar
(Adapted from Nora Kogan, realsimple.com)
 
 

1
large eggplant (about 1 1⁄2 pounds)
1/2
small onion, finely chopped (1⁄4 cup)
1
clove garlic, finely chopped
2
tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley, plus more for serving
1
tablespoon olive oil
1
teaspoon red wine vinegar
1
tablespoon mayonnaise (optional)
Sea salt and black pepper
Tortilla chips and/or cut-up vegetables, for serving
 
Heat oven to 400° F. Using a fork, prick the eggplant all over. Place on a foil-lined baking sheet and roast until very tender, 50 to 60 minutes. When the eggplant is cool enough to handle, halve it lengthwise and scrape out
the flesh, discarding the skin. Finely chop the flesh and transfer it to a large bowl. Add the onion, garlic, parsley, oil, vinegar, mayonnaise (if using), ½ teaspoon sea salt, and ¼ teaspoon pepper and mix to combine. Sprinkle with additional parsley and serve with the chips and vegetables, if desired.
 


Thank you Sarah George! Be sure to check out her site!
Time to sign up for Winter CSA!
 
It’s hard to think about hearty soups and the smell of roasted dinners filling the house when it’s 90 degrees outside but on the farm we are busy making sure you will have that food in the colder months ahead. The goal of Community Supported Agriculture is to get money to farms when they need it most, at the beginning of a season. The winter share is a little different, by the time we are signing you up most of the labor and money has been spent getting the food in the ground. This year we have been hit hard by the drought. Every vegetable we sell costs us more to produce because of the labor and money it takes to move water.We are asking that if possible when you sign up for the winter share you consider paying in full right away.
 
As you’ve seen this summer in the farm stand, despite the drought and tight budget our produce quality and variety has been great if we do say so ourselves. The winter share will be no different. Our winter crops are looking great in the field!
 
Sign up today on our website or at the farm stand or at one of our Farmer’s Market booths!
 
NEW! Partial share! Due to your requests we are now offering smaller sized share, all the greens that you get in a full share but lighter on the roots and storage crops.
 
Full Share: The full share is great if you cook most of your meals at home. You can see on our website photos and a week by week list of what our shareholders got last winter under the CSA tab, click on “What’s in a winter share

CSA Share 8/28/16
               Full                        Half
Potatoes 2                             1
Greens    1                             1
Tomatoes 4                           2
Cucumbers 2                         1
Carrots      1                           1/2
Beets          1                   Choice
Garlic         1                           1
Bell Peppers  2                       1
Eggplant       1                 Choice
Kale or Chard 1                        1
Squash          2                       1
 
 

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Posted 8/25/2016 9:31am by Andre Cantelmo.
It’s hard to think about hearty soups and the smell of roasted dinners filling the house when it’s 90 degrees outside but on the farm we are busy making sure you will have that food in the colder months ahead. The goal of Community Supported Agriculture is to get money to farms when they need it most, at the beginning of a season. The winter share is a little different, by the time we are signing you up most of the labor and money has been spent getting the food in the ground. This year we have been hit hard by the drought. Every vegetable we sell costs us more to produce because of the labor and money it takes to move water. We are asking that if possible when you sign up for the winter share you consider paying in full right away.
 
As you’ve seen this summer in the farm stand, despite the drought and tight budget our produce quality and variety has been great if we do say so ourselves. The winter share will be no different. Our winter crops are looking great in the field!
 
Sign up today on our website or at the farm stand or at one of our Farmer’s Market booths!
 
NEW! Partial share! Due to your requests we are now offering smaller sized share, all the greens that you get in a full share but lighter on the roots and storage crops.
 
Full Share: The full share is great if you cook most of your meals at home. You can see on our website photos and a week by week list of what our shareholders got last winter under the CSA tab, click on “What’s in a winter share
 

See you this week!

Locally yours,
Andre 

 

SIMPLE SUMMER SALAD

with Carrot Ginger Dressing

Serves 2


 
 

Salad
4 cups salad greens

2 tablespoons sesame seeds

1 chopped bell pepper

2 grated carrots

1 chopped tomato

Feel free to add: onion, cucumber, fennel bulb or whatever veggies you like

 

Carrot Ginger Dressing

1 lemon, juiced

1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil

1/2 cup raw apple cider vinegar

1 inch piece of fresh ginger

1 carrot, chopped

Sea salt & black pepper, to taste

1 tablespoon honey (optional)

Add the dressing ingredients to a blender. Blend until well incorporated. Add water for desired consistency. Add salad ingredients to a bowl, top with Carrot Ginger Dressing and serve.


Thank you Sarah George! Be sure to check out her site!

Don't forget to check out our Free Children's workshops! New Calender for September.


CSA Week Five 7/3-7/9
 

Last week farm stand folks got a bag of basil in their share. This week it will be Portsmouth and Dovers turn.
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Posted 8/14/2016 10:27am by Andre Cantelmo.

 

This weeks news comes from a researcher doing work here at Heron Pond Farm.

 

 

My name is Rafael Valentin and I am a fourth year doctoral student at Rutgers University in the Ecology and Evolution graduate program. I conduct research on invasive species, spanning several areas that contribute to invasion dynamics at both large biogeographical and small local scales. Specifically, I address surveillance and monitoring methods for invasive species, while also designing advanced techniques to more readily detect invasives before they become problematic. I also focus on global transport and invasion pathways in an effort to determine where the invasive species come from, and how they got there. My current research efforts are focused on developing new surveillance methods and mapping the global invasion pathways for an agricultural pest, the brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys) that is spreading rapidly across the United States.

 

 

Previous research has shown that this bug originated from Asia, mainly in the Beijing, China area. It was first found in the United States in Allentown, Pennsylvania, and quickly established throughout the mid-Atlantic area. This is a voracious agricultural pest that does not depend on any specific crops. The damage that they cause to crops is substantial, with historic losses in Maryland in 2012, resulting in a 100% loss of peaches. Due to the dramatic level of destruction this pest can cause, there is a high need to control them and mitigate the damage this pest will cause on farms. The goal of my new surveillance method is to detect the presence of this pest using molecular methods without having to ever see it. This removes the need for populations to be at high numbers, before they can be seen in traps, which can allow for a more rapid response to eradication and control efforts in agricultural fields.

 

 

The premise behind this research is rooted in a concept called “environmental DNA” (eDNA). This states that all living organisms shed biological material that contains their DNA directly into their surrounding environment. My work at Heron Pond Farms is to apply this technique, which is usually used in aquatic systems, to a terrestrial system for the benefit of agriculture. With the help of the farmers, I have set up several traps throughout the farm that are traditionally used to detect the brown marmorated stinkbug. In addition, I am also collecting samples from various crops throughout the farm, which have the potential to contain brown marmorated stinkbugs’ DNA. These samples are then taken back to Rutgers University for genetic analysis. By using the traditional methods alongside my own techniques, I am able to directly compare which of the methods is most effective.

 


Thank you so much Rafael for your work with invasives. This kind of work goes a long way towards making our lives better out here on the farm.
 
Locally yours,
Andre 

 


Cool as a Cucumber Beet Soup
Serves 2
 
4 beets, peeled and chopped
1 cucumber, peeled and seeded
1 tablespoon chopped onion
Juice from ½ a lime
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
5 basil leaves
1 cup water
Black pepper & sea salt to taste
 
Blend all ingredients together in a blender or food processor.
Chill for at least 15 minutes and serve.
 


Thank you Sarah George! Be sure to check out her site!

Don't forget to check out our Free Children's workshops!


CSA Week Five 7/3-7/9
 
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Posted 7/31/2016 11:06am by Andre Cantelmo.

Boston Area Gleaners

This weeks crop report from one of our year round farmer, and crew chief Erin. Erin has been with us a good time now. She has taken on Heron Pond's food justice mission and is taking is to great places. More to come from Erin soon! If you have and interest in food justice feel free to get in touch with her.

At Heron Pond Farm we strive to build community through local agriculture. Building a local food system for all of us doesn’t only mean our CSA members, local restaurants, and schools. It also includes soup kitchens, food banks, and food pantries. We have been busy this growing season making sure that there is a reliable supply chain of surplus produce between our farm and all our neighbors in need.

This past Sunday we invited the Boston Area Gleaners to our beet and chard field. There, seven volunteer gleaners harvested a total of 430 pounds of produce. Gleaning is the act of collecting surplus crops from farmer’s fields. In ancient times, land owners invited peasants into their fields after the main harvest was completed, allowing them to take what they needed from the left overs. In today’s world, there are many gleaning organizations that have a core group of dedicated volunteers who harvest surplus crops to donate to local area food pantry’s, meal programs, and low income markets. These gleaners give farmers a way to use produce that would otherwise be left in the fields to be tilled under.

This coming Sunday the Boston Area Gleaners will be visiting again. They are a great group and could always use more hands. If you would like to get involved with gleaning visit their site athttp://www.bostonareagleaners.org/. Or check out our friends at Seacoast Eat Local: http://seacoasteatlocal.org/2013/06/gleaning-with-seacoast-eat-local/


See you this week!

Locally yours,
Erin 

Roasted Corn & Tomato Salsa
Adapted from NYT Cooking
 
Makes about 2 ½ cups

1 ½ pounds ripe tomatoes
1 or 2 jalapeños (about 1 ounce)
1 ear of corn, shucked
½ small onion, sliced about 1/4 inch thick (about 2 ounces)
4 garlic cloves, peeled
Sea salt to taste
1 ½ teaspoons lime juice
¼ cup water (optional)
⅓ to ½ cup chopped cilantro (to taste)
 

Preheat broiler and set rack 4 inches below. If your broiler and oven are separate, also preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Line 2 baking sheets with foil.
 
Place tomatoes and jalapeños on one of the baking sheets and set under broiler, about 4 inches from heat. Broil for about 6 minutes, until skins are charred and blackened in spots. Using tongs, flip over tomatoes and jalapeño and continue to broil for another 6 minutes. The tomatoes and chiles should be softened and cooked through as well as charred. Tip tomatoes and chiles, along with any juices in the pan, into a bowl and allow to cool.
 
Place corn on baking sheet and set under the broiler. Broil until you hear the kernels beginning to pop, 2 to 4 minutes. Corn should be nicely browned on one side. Flip over and broil for 2 minutes, or until you hear popping, on the other side. Remove from heat, allow to cool, then cut kernels from cob and set aside.
 
If using the same oven to roast the onions, turn heat down to 425 degrees. Break up onions into rings and place on baking sheet in a single layer. Add garlic and place in oven. Roast, stirring every 5 minutes, until onions have softened and are lightly browned and charred on edges and garlic is soft and browned in spots, about 15 minutes. If some of the smaller pieces of onion begin to char more quickly than others, remove them sooner.
 
Stem jalapeños and place with onions and garlic in a food processor fitted with the bowl as necessary. Transfer to a large bowl.
 
When tomatoes are cool enough to handle, core and discard skins (hold over bowl to catch juices). Place in food processor with juice and pulse to a coarse purée. Add to bowl with chopped onions, garlic and jalapeño. Add the lime juice, season generously with sea salt and stir in the cilantro and corn. If desired, thin out with water.

 

Thank you Sarah George! Be sure to check out her site!
A word or two about the drought and CSA
 
We have heard that there are more than a few CSA’s that have had to cut back or suspend the distribution of produce do to the lack of water. While this drought is profound and perhaps worse than we have seen, we do not anticipate having to cut back on the CSA. Most of you will remember the membership agreement that you had to check off before you could sign up for a share. This agreement contains the essence of what CSA is about. Nevertheless, some may not have seen it as we tend to check off these things in our live all the time, one example being the terms of service to get an app on our phones. For those of you who missed it I reprint it here:

By purchasing a share in the Heron Pond Farm CSA program, I have accepted the terms of this membership agreement.

Members of the CSA will receive a weekly share consisting of approximately 4-12 items (shares will vary in size and weight depending on the time of the season). One aspect of CSA is that members support their farmer by sharing in the inherent risks of agriculture (poor weather, drought, crop failure, etc.) and the rewards (responsibly grown, exceptionally fresh vegetables, the bounty of a good season, etc.) involved in farming. CSA farmers purposely plan for such contingencies; the farmers use growing techniques that protect the harvest to minimize the risk and optimize the rewards. On the whole members will get a wide variety of vegetables in plentiful amounts.
I understand this principle and agree that there is no guarantee on the exact amount or type of produce I will receive in my share. By participating in the CSA, I am supporting the local farmer as well as more equitable food distribution, and I am helping to create a more environmentally and economically healthy society.


By becoming a member, I agree to support the farm with timely payments. I commit to picking up my share(s) weekly and I understand that if I, or someone I designate, is unable to pick up my share(s), they will be donated to the local food pantry. 

I truly hope the shareholders in those CSA’s that are affected by drought will be understanding and realize that this is what they sighned up for. Sadly, some will not. They will see their CSA as more of a subscription veggie service and not support the farm the following year. I know Greg and I have thought of the CSA we run as more of a hybrid, trying to make the share work for folks even when some crops failed. It brings up an interesting question of what are you looking for in your CSA? What kind of security to you expect? What where your goals when you joined? We would love to hear from you. Let us know what you think.
 

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