Farmers' Blog

Field Report

What's New?
Posted 7/31/2016 10:02am by Andre Cantelmo.

CSA Week Eight 7/24-7/30

This time of year we begging to think about the next season. Last year we planted rye in a all of our fields for soil building. Some of the land we leave to cover crop standing. This gives us a source of cover crop seed for next year as well as mulch straw. Believe it or not, there is more organic matter being formed below the ground then above. So these fields will see a net increase in organic matter from the year before. Where did the carbon come from? The air around us. So, good farming practices not only improve soil but help scrub carbon out of the air. Yeah farming!

Check out the video

https://www.dropbox.com/s/rsg1d26staxua5a/2016-07-22%2015.08.24.mp4?dl=0
 

We can do this with oats, wheat, and barley as well. Some years our shareholders have even gotten some wheat berries in a winter share. The important thing is to keep doing things that are going to build a nice soil. Without good soil the entire system falls apart. We hope you take some time to check out the video of the grain harvest. It is a lot of work but fun as well.

These small systems where everywhere in the 1950’s. As the green revolution took apart our regional food system the equipment got bigger and bigger to reflect our new centralized food system. Heron Pond Farm is just a small part of bringing regional food systems back to this country. Having access to this small piece of equipment lets us farm in a way that gives back to the land while helping to complete our regional food system.

Thanks for all your support!

See you this week!
Andre

July 26th, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm &July 28th, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am

Fruit and Vegetable Stamps –Who needs stamps when you have an entire garden! We'll use items from our garden as stamps and paintbrushes to make our very own garden art. 
 

Thai-Style Haricots Verts


 

  • 2 tablespoons peanut oil
  • 2 small dried red chiles
  • 3/4 pound haricots verts, trimmed
  • 3/4 pound red Swiss chard, stems cut into 3-by- 1/4 -inch matchsticks and leaves into 2-inch pieces
  • 1/2 pound shiitake mushrooms, stems discarded and caps sliced 1/4 inch thick
  • 2 medium garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 cup chicken stock or canned low-sodium broth
  • 2 tablespoons fish sauce, preferably Squid brand, or 2 tablespoons soy sauce mixed with a pinch of sugar (see Note)
  • Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large nonreactive skillet until almost smoking. Add the chiles and cook over moderately high heat until just brown, about 30 seconds. Add the beans and the Swiss chard stems and sauté until tender and charred, about 6 minutes. Transfer to a platter and discard the chiles.
  • Heat 2 teaspoons of the oil in the skillet. Add the shiitakes and sauté over high heat until softened and browned, about 3 minutes. Add the shiitakes to the beans.
  • Heat the remaining 1 teaspoon oil in the skillet. Add the garlic and cook over high heat, stirring, until fragrant but not browned, about 30 seconds. Add the Swiss chard leaves and 2 tablespoons of water and cook until wilted and tender, about 2 minutes. Return all the vegetables to the skillet and sauté until heated through. Stir in the chicken broth and fish sauce and heat through. Serve warm.

NOTES

Fish sauce is available at Asian markets.

From Food and Wine

Heron Pond Farm - PlantID/Foraging Walks

and Food Preservation Workshops

 

Take a walk, have some fun, learn about edible plants.

Join Jan Wirth of   “Nettles & Knotweed” at Heron Pond Farm for a monthly Plant ID/Foraging Walk on the farm beginning Sunday, July 24.  Jan and local forager Rob Wolfe of Yellow Birch Herbs will lead a walk on the farm each month which will focus on identifying wild and not so wild edible and medicinal plants.
 

Plant ID/Foraging Walk – Sunday, July 24 from 10AM to Noon. $25

Our first walk will focus on mid-summer plants that are ready to harvest in July. Dress for a warm summer day; bring insect repellant and a water bottle. A wild snack and handouts will be provided. We will meet in the parking lot at the Heron Pond Farm farm stand.

 

Please call Jan Wirth at (207) 251-2333 to register for the walk or for more information. We will be posting future workshops on the Nettles & Knotweed Facebook page – www.facebook.com/nettlesandknotweed

 

 

Always wanted to know more about preserving all the amazing produce from Heron Pond Farm and your CSA share?

Jan Wirth of “Nettles & Knotweed” is a University of Maine Cooperative Extension Master Food Preserver. She will teach a monthly food preservation class “The ABCs of Food Preservation” at the farm beginning Tuesday evening, July 26.

 

Food Preservation Workshop – Tuesday, July 26 from 6 – 9PM $35

This workshop is part of a monthly series “The ABCs of Food Preservation.” In this workshop we will discuss the basics of various methods of preserving the harvest using blueberries as our primary ingredient as they are currently ripe and abundant at the farm. Snacks and handouts will be provided. Workshops will be held at the Heron Pond Farm farm stand.

 

Come early and pick some blueberries from the U-Pick area next to the farm stand so you can re-create what you learn at the workshop when you get home. $3.50/lb.

 

Please call Jan Wirth at (207) 251-2333 to register for the workshop or for more information. We will be posting future workshops on the Nettles & Knotweed Facebook page – www.facebook.com/nettlesandknotweed

Posted 7/17/2016 5:21pm by Andre Cantelmo.

If you did not get the fancy email through Mailchimp at the same time as this mail please unblock us from your spam or promotional folder. Thank!

CSA Week Seven 7/17-7/23

The blueberries have not looked this good in years. The crew put in a lot of time pruning this spring and Greg has set up a nice watering system that will keep the bushes in good shape going forward. We are not the only ones that have noticed. The birds are getting more then there share, as a matter of fact they are getting your share. We need to work together to get our share of the berries back. The best way to do this is to get more folks out in the patch. In past years we set it up so you could either get berries in your share or pick twice as much. This year we invite you to pick a season’s worth of berries all at once! This helps the farm in so many ways. First the berries will be picked instead of eaten. Our crew is finding it hard to stay ahead of them. Next, the more people that are in the patch the less birds will be. They don’t like sharing the space with you and will run away for the most part. Most importantly, this brings all of us together in the true spirt of CSA. You get to be out on the farm that you invested in, bringing in your share of the crop.

Peak berry season is three weeks long. Any time during these three weeks you may come and pick your berries. You can pick all three week’s worth at once if you like, this may come in handy for those coming from our remote sites. Of course you can pick more if you like and receive your CSA discount. Greg and I have made it a priority to include bird netting in next year’s budget. We estimate that the birds are getting 50% of the crop. Bird netting will go a long way towards assuring plenty of berries in future years shares. Thanks for your help and enjoy all the berries!

Why not time your berry picking with a free children's Garden Program with Abigail Langsner.  Abi is so excited to be combining her passion for teaching and farming in the Children’ Garden here at Heron Pond Farm. A graduate of the University of Vermont, she’s been teaching elementary school for eight years now and is currently a fourth grade teacher in Ipswich. Her love for farming grew from summers spent being a “farm kid” on her grandparents’ small fruit and vegetable farm in Georgetown, MA.  While it’s been awhile since she slid down a hay pile, she’ll always be a farm kid at heart. 
 
July 19th, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm July 23, 2016 9:00am-10:00am
The Buzz About Bees –Do you hear that buzz? It's a bee hard at work pollinating the plants in our garden. We'll learn why bees are so important for our gardens and even practice our own bee dance.
 
July 21st, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am July 23ed, 2016 1:00pm-2:00pm
Container Gardening– Bring your own container (a pot, clean yogurt container, old Tupperware, or even an old, too small rain boot will work). You'll learn how a seed grows, plant your own seeds, and bring them home to watch them grow. 

See You This Week!
Andre

ZUCCHINI NOODLES
(Makes 2 servings)

2 zucchini, shredded or “spiralized” using a vegetable spiralizer

¼ cup tahini (sesame paste)

¼ cup fresh lemon juice (about 2 lemons)

1 clove garlic, minced

⅛ teaspoon onion powder

¼ teaspoon sea salt

⅛ cup water or more for desired consistency

1 teaspoon honey

Shred or spiralize zucchini and place to the side.  If you prefer a warm meal, heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a pan over medium to high heat and add zucchini. Sauté for 2-3 minutes until soft. Remove from heat and place in a strainer.

Combine remaining ingredients in a small bowl and whisk with a fork. Add more water to thin the dressing, if desired. Top zucchini with dressing, toss, and serve.
 
 

 

Thank you Sarah George! Be sure to check out her site!

Heron Pond Farm - PlantID/Foraging Walks

and Food Preservation Workshops

 

Take a walk, have some fun, learn about edible plants.

Join Jan Wirth of   “Nettles & Knotweed” at Heron Pond Farm for a monthly Plant ID/Foraging Walk on the farm beginning Sunday, July 24.  Jan and local forager Rob Wolfe of Yellow Birch Herbs will lead a walk on the farm each month which will focus on identifying wild and not so wild edible and medicinal plants.
 

Plant ID/Foraging Walk – Sunday, July 24 from 10AM to Noon. $25

Our first walk will focus on mid-summer plants that are ready to harvest in July. Dress for a warm summer day; bring insect repellant and a water bottle. A wild snack and handouts will be provided. We will meet in the parking lot at the Heron Pond Farm farm stand.

 

Please call Jan Wirth at (207) 251-2333 to register for the walk or for more information. We will be posting future workshops on the Nettles & Knotweed Facebook page – www.facebook.com/nettlesandknotweed

 

 

Always wanted to know more about preserving all the amazing produce from Heron Pond Farm and your CSA share?

Jan Wirth of “Nettles & Knotweed” is a University of Maine Cooperative Extension Master Food Preserver. She will teach a monthly food preservation class “The ABCs of Food Preservation” at the farm beginning Tuesday evening, July 26.

 

Food Preservation Workshop – Tuesday, July 26 from 6 – 9PM $35

This workshop is part of a monthly series “The ABCs of Food Preservation.” In this workshop we will discuss the basics of various methods of preserving the harvest using blueberries as our primary ingredient as they are currently ripe and abundant at the farm. Snacks and handouts will be provided. Workshops will be held at the Heron Pond Farm farm stand.

 

Come early and pick some blueberries from the U-Pick area next to the farm stand so you can re-create what you learn at the workshop when you get home. $3.50/lb.

 

Please call Jan Wirth at (207) 251-2333 to register for the workshop or for more information. We will be posting future workshops on the Nettles & Knotweed Facebook page – www.facebook.com/nettlesandknotweed

KEEP IN TOUCH

Posted 7/3/2016 9:35am by Andre Cantelmo.

"Knee High By The Fourth of July!" Who's Knees?

This weeks crop report from one of our year round farmer Alex. Alex has been with us a few seasons so he is getting a sense for the rhythm of the year.

The view from the tractor seat changed pretty dramatically over the course of the month of June.  The month started with corn that had just poked a leaf above the soil and ends with those same plants up around my knees.  Greens that were planted in the beginning of the month are already ready to be mowed so that the beds can be prepped for another round of seeding.  And weeds that weren’t there last time I looked are somehow shooting up and vying with the leeks for sunlight. 

July starts with the first and most tender of our potato crop, yet even as we harvest and enjoy the tasty tubers in a summer potato salad, we are working diligently to make sure that the other three acres of potatoes provide a plentiful harvest to put in the root cellar come fall.  And that is representative of the task we face in July.  As planting slows down we will turn our attention from getting plants in the ground to taking care of the crops we have already planted, making sure there is plenty of tasty and beautiful produce for summer and beyond.

 

See you this week!

Locally yours,
Alex 


Heron Pond Farm ~ Children's Garden Workshops

We are very excited to be starting a Children's Garden Program at Heron Pond Farm this year with Abigail Langsner.  Abi is so excited to be combining her passion for teaching and farming in the Children’ Garden here at Heron Pond Farm. A graduate of the University of Vermont, she’s been teaching elementary school for eight years now and is currently a fourth grade teacher in Ipswich. Her love for farming grew from summers spent being a “farm kid” on her grandparents’ small fruit and vegetable farm in Georgetown, MA.  While it’s been awhile since she slid down a hay pile, she’ll always be a farm kid at heart. 

Please accompany your child(ren) during all workshops.  Workshop descriptions can be found below. Printable calender available here.

Container Gardening
– Bring your own container (a pot, clean yogurt container, old Tupperware, or even an old, too small rain boot will work). You'll learn how a seed grows, plant your own seeds, and bring them home to watch them grow. 

Making Mud Pies –You’ll make a pie out of mud, decorate it with the garden's bounty, and let it bake in the sun. Later you can feed it to your compost pile! 
Stone Paperweights - Lots of rocks can make it hard for plants to grow, but you will find a good use for ours. You'll paint your own beautiful paperweight using a rock you discover in the garden.  
Three Sisters Gardening –We'll have fun planting our own "Three Sisters Garden" and watch and wait as the corn, beans, and squash help each other grow! We may even have a chance to play Three Sisters Tag. 
Digging for Decomposers - Have you ever wondered who lives below our feet? There is an entire world of wiggly worms and burrowing bugs who are decomposers. They help make our garden soil fertile. Let's explore the world beneath our feet and see what we can find. 
The Buzz About Bees –Do you hear that buzz? It's a bee hard at work pollinating the plants in our garden. We'll learn why bees are so important for our gardens and even practice our own bee dance. 
Fruit and Vegetable Stamps –Who needs stamps when you have an entire garden! We'll use items from our garden as stamps and paintbrushes to make our very own garden art. 


Beet & Sugar Snap Pea Salad
Serves 6 


3 medium beets, trimmed (peel after baking)
1/2 pound sugar snap peas, trimmed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon cider vinegar
1/4 cup olive oil
3 tablespoons chopped fresh dill or 1 tablespoon dried
2  teaspoons honey
1/4 pound fresh arugula or salad greens

 

Preheat oven to 375° (or wrap in foil on the grill). Wrap beets in aluminum foil. Bake until tender, about 1 hour. Cool. Peel beets and cut into wedges.
Cook sugar snap peas in large saucepan of boiling salted water until crisp-tender, about 1 minute. Drain. Rinse with cold water; drain well. Pat dry.
Mix mustard and vinegar in small bowl. Gradually mix in oil, then dill and honey. (Can be prepared 4 hours ahead. Cover sugar snap peas and chill. Cover dressing and beets separately and let stand at room temperature.)
Line platter with arugula or salad greens. Mix beets, sugar snap peas and dressing in medium bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Spoon on top of the arugula or salad greens.
 
Adapted from ediblecommunities.com
 

 

Thank you Sarah George! Be sure to check out her site!

Full Share:                                    
1 Quart of Potatoes                       
1 Bunch Beets                             
2 Lettuce Heads                              
2 Tomato                                      
1 Pint Peas                                  
1 Bag Greens


1 Bunch Chard

Half Share:


1 Pint of Potatoes                       
1 Bunch Beets                             
1 Lettuce Heads                              
1 Tomato                                      
1 Pint Peas                                  
 

                                                      KEEP IN TOUCH

Posted 6/26/2016 8:55am by Andre Cantelmo.

CSA Week Four 6-26 to 7-2

Water seems so simple most times. Yet when folks ask us if we are chemical free it is the first chemical that comes to mind. So important, not only for the reasons that come to mind, but for all other nutrient uptake. NH4+, NO3-, Ca++, and H2PO4- are all nutrients that plants cannot uptake without water. All are part of the chemical dance that has come together to form life and on this planet that has all come about do to water.

Thankfully on this farm we have invested well in the moving of water. In dry years like this it can make the difference between no crop and the best year of your life. I am finding myself grateful to the farmer before me that set up irrigation system, as well as to all the folks working on better ways for us to get our job done. Seeing the happiness in the plants for the water they are getting fills me with pride in our farm. So when you are enjoying your share this week take some time to think about the wonders of water.
 

See you this week!

Locally yours,
Andre 

Full Share:                                    Half Share:
1 Bunch Scallions                        1 Bunch Scallions
1 Bunch Chard                             1 Bunch Chard
1 Bag Salinova                              1 Bag Salinova
2 Tomato                                       1 Tomato
1 Pint Peas                                    1 Pint Peas
1 Bag Greens
1 Bunch Kale

CHARD WITH SESAME SEEDS AND SCALLIONS
3 to 4 servings 

1 tablespoon coconut oil
1 sweet pepper, chopped
1 bunch chard, chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
Sea salt to taste
Black pepper to taste
4 scallions, chopped for garnish
1 tablespoon black or white sesame seeds for garnish
Fresh lemon

Add coconut oil to a large sauté pan over medium high heat. When the oil is hot, add sweet pepper. Sauté for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the chopped chard and sauté for another 2 minutes until it is wilted. Add minced garlic, sea salt, and black pepper. Sauté for another 1 to 2 minutes until the garlic is fragrant. Transfer the sautéed kale from the pan onto a plate. Top with a squeeze of lemon, sesame seeds and chopped scallions.

 

Thank you Sarah George! Be sure to check out her site!


Heron Pond Farm ~ Children's Garden Workshops

We are very excited to be starting a Children's Garden Program at Heron Pond Farm this year with Abigail Langsner.  Please accompany your child(ren) during all workshops.  Workshop descriptions can be found below.Printable calender available here.
Container Gardening
– Bring your own container (a pot, clean yogurt container, old Tupperware, or even an old, too small rain boot will work). You'll learn how a seed grows, plant your own seeds, and bring them home to watch them grow. 
Making Mud Pies –You’ll make a pie out of mud, decorate it with the garden's bounty, and let it bake in the sun. Later you can feed it to your compost pile! 
Stone Paperweights - Lots of rocks can make it hard for plants to grow, but you will find a good use for ours. You'll paint your own beautiful paperweight using a rock you discover in the garden.  
Three Sisters Gardening –We'll have fun planting our own "Three Sisters Garden" and watch and wait as the corn, beans, and squash help each other grow! We may even have a chance to play Three Sisters Tag. 
Digging for Decomposers - Have you ever wondered who lives below our feet? There is an entire world of wiggly worms and burrowing bugs who are decomposers. They help make our garden soil fertile. Let's explore the world beneath our feet and see what we can find. 
The Buzz About Bees –Do you hear that buzz? It's a bee hard at work pollinating the plants in our garden. We'll learn why bees are so important for our gardens and even practice our own bee dance. 
Fruit and Vegetable Stamps –Who needs stamps when you have an entire garden! We'll use items from our garden as stamps and paintbrushes to make our very own garden art. 
Posted 6/26/2016 8:50am by Andre Cantelmo.

Posted 6/18/2016 9:53pm by Andre Cantelmo.

CSA Week Three 6-19 to 6-25

June means Strawberries! Right now they are at their peak. We have been picking daily and will continue thru next week. Eating them out of hand, in strawberry shortcake or on an arugula salad with cheve and a light balsamic dressing.

The planting continues in all of the fields. The children’s garden located right behind our farm stand is also filling up. It will soon be available for the community to explore and enjoy.

This week Seacoast Eat Local was here gleaning our early spring crops. These vegetables will make their way to local NH food pantries for the weekend.

Peas are on the way! Enjoy your share this week.
 

See you this week!

Locally yours,
Erin

Full Share:                                    Half Share:
1 Quart Srawberries                    1 Pint Strawberries
Bunch Onions                              Bunch Onions
1 Heads Lettuce                           1 Head Lettuce
1 Tomato                                       1 Tomato
1 Kale                                             1 Kale 
1 Bag Greens
1 Pint Peas
1 Bunch Chard

Brushetta with Kale

TOPPING

1/2 pound of kale
3 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 Garlic cloves crushed
1/2 cup thinly sliced onions
Salt to taste
Pinch of crushed red pepper flakes

Separate the Kale leaves and remove the thick stem from the center of each leaf.  Shred the leaves 1/4 inch wide (aprox).  Wash the leaves thoroughly and drain them well, preferably in a salad spinner.  Reserve the stems for another use, (vegetable or chicken stock).  In a medium size skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat.  Add the garlic cloves and cook until golden brown stirring about two minutes.  Add the onions and cook until wilted, about 2 minutes or so.  Add the Kale, season lightly with salt and add the pepper flakes if desired.  Reduce the heat to low and cook the Kale, stirring often, until very tender.  If the Kale begins to stick to the skillet, add a tablespoon of water and continue cooking.  Plate the bruschetta.  Taste your Kale, and adjust seasoning to taste.  Divide the Kale evenly among the bruschetta and serve immediately.

Slow Food Seacoast

Growing, Cooking & Eating Good Food

Slow Food Seacoast and Heirloom Harvest Project present

The Fifth Annual Farm-A-Q 

Sunday June 26th at Heron Pond Farm in South Hampton, NH

12-4pm

The fifth annual Farm-a-Q will take place this year on Sunday June 26th at Heron Pond Farm in South Hampton NH. A joint effort of Slow Food Seacoast and the Heirloom Harvest Project, Farm-a-Q is a picnic-style event with a bounty of heirloom and heritage foods grown on local farms and prepared by some of the area’s best restaurants. The afternoon features an incredible buffet, showcasing the abundance of delicious locally grown products and the talent of local chefs. Heron Pond Farm CSA members can get $5.00 off.Tickets available at Slow Food Seacost.
Posted 6/12/2016 11:42am by Andre Cantelmo.

CSA Week Two 6-12 to 6-18

Crops are really starting to look good here on the farm and we are happy that you will be receiving the first of many tomatoes this week. We were hoping to make strawberries part of the share this week but the cool weather has them ripening slowly. What we have done in past years is start them up as soon as they get rolling even if that means mid-week. If that is the case do not fear. Those that picked up earlier in the week will still get there full share of the berry harvest. The timing will just need to match up with the crop.
 
We have decided to let all the folks on the farm get in on the field reports this year. So our good friend and year round farmer Jon is the first of our staff to take a crack at it. Enjoy these notes from the crew as they come in all year.

Andre

This time of year can be stressful yet have redeeming beautiful qualities at the same time. Patching holes in irrigation lines, coming in to work to find more deer damage, and the high winds making a mess of everything can be quickly forgotten when there are veggies coming out of the field. Ripe strawberries and tomatoes makes the thought of woodchucks getting pleasantly plump off your hard labor almost vanish. Almost. It’s also a great time to witness the wonders of Mother Nature. Between the vibrant birds, the snapping turtles and all of the offspring there is a lot of diverse sites that you really can’t just take for granted. There’s also the pleasure of clearing a damn that a beaver made which flooded one of the farm roads. So folks, blueberries are turning color, sweet potatoes are in the ground and we’re busy tending to our main tomato crop. All in all farming can be a truly frustrating and beautiful thing. Enjoy this week’s share!

 

See you this week!

Locally yours,
Jon 

Full Share:                                    Half Share:
2lbs Carrots                                  1lb Carrots
2 Heads Lettuce                           1 Head Lettuce
1 Bunch Garlic Scapes                1 Bunch Garlic Scapes
1 Tomato                                       1 Tomato
1 Kale or Chard                            1 Kale or Chard
1 Bag Greens

CHILLED CURRIED CARROT SOUP

SERVES 2

2 - 3 carrots, chopped
½ an avocado, pit removed
¾ cup water
1 teaspoon curry powder
¼ teaspoon coriander
⅛ teaspoon cumin
1 tablespoon lime juice
1 tablespoon olive oil
¼ teaspoon turmeric
⅛ teaspoon sea salt
Cilantro leaves for garnish

Place all ingredients in blender and blend until smooth. Chill in refrigerator for at least 30 minutes. Top with a few cilantro leaves and serve.
 

Thank you Sarha George! Be sure to check out her site!

Slow Food Seacoast

Growing, Cooking & Eating Good Food

Slow Food Seacoast and Heirloom Harvest Project present

The Fifth Annual Farm-A-Q 

Sunday June 26th at Heron Pond Farm in South Hampton, NH

12-4pm

The fifth annual Farm-a-Q will take place this year on Sunday June 26th at Heron Pond Farm in South Hampton NH. A joint effort of Slow Food Seacoast and the Heirloom Harvest Project, Farm-a-Q is a picnic-style event with a bounty of heirloom and heritage foods grown on local farms and prepared by some of the area’s best restaurants. The afternoon features an incredible buffet, showcasing the abundance of delicious locally grown products and the talent of local chefs. Heron Pond Farm CSA members can get $5.00 off.Tickets available at Slow Food Seacost.
Posted 6/6/2016 12:00pm by Andre Cantelmo.

We can’t wait to get this season started!

We sent our first newsletter out with mail chimp to help make our communication more interesting and easy to read. If you did not receive it, the email may be in your spam folder. Could you take the time to check? If it is there be sure to unblock us so we may get all your information to you in a timely manner. Some folks have said they were not getting the email so I thought I would send this out just in case.

Spring is a busy time here on the farm and the crew is straight out getting things in the ground. This week we saw a lot lettuce getting planted as well as celery root. In this weeks share you will find some of the last carrots around these parts along with our first offerings from the fields. Looks like strawberries and tomatoes are around right the corner.


Full Share                               Half Share
2lbs carrots                                  1 lb carrots
1 head lettuce                              1 head lettuce
1 bunch onions                            1 bunch onions
1lb tatsoi                                       ½ lb tatsoi
1 lb bok choi                                 1 bag salad greens
1 bag salad greens
 
If you are new to our C.S.A. or can not recall what day your pick up is or want to see your account information please Click Here. Here you can find more about our Dover or Portsmouth pick up sites.

Posted 4/7/2016 7:49am by Andre Cantelmo.

 

  We're hopeful that spring is here to stay after our mini 'ice age' in April. As cold as it got it was amazing how quickly the snow melted under the strong April sun. The cold air had hardly lifted yesterday when the spring peepers went right back to their calls. We should all be so resilient! So far we haven't seen any damage around the farm as a result of the cold snap. We'll keep our fingers crossed.

  This will be the last winter share of the season. We thank you all for your support and hope that you enjoyed the food we brought your way. Our summer CSA begins the first week in June and until that time we'll be busy planting and tending the crops that will feed us this summer. Prepare some great meals and get outside to enjoy the spring weather that is settling in around us.

  Best, Greg

  

This weeks share:

   1 lb fingerling potatoes

   1 lb russet potatoes

   3 lbs carrots

   2 lbs parsnips

   1 lb watermelon radish (or 1 lb other roots)

   1 butternut squash

   4 apples

   1 bag baby romaine

   1 bag salanova or 1 bag spinach

Posted 3/24/2016 8:37am by Andre Cantelmo.

We find ourselves at the end of another winter season as spring settles in around us, despite Monday's snow. That snow has disappeared quickly, again revealing the greening cover crop on our fields. Our tunnels are producing lettuce and spinach in abundance right now with the strong March sun and moderate temperatures. We're excited for the start of a new season, especially now that we can see the growth on our overwintered onions and garlic. Exciting times for farmers and those love good food!

  This will be the final pickup of the season for folks in Dover and Portsmouth. We appreciate your support of the farm and hope that you will join us for the CSA this summer. On April 9th you can find us at Wentworth Greenhouses in Rollinsford and on April 23rd at Exeter HS, if you are missing your local veggies. May brings the opening of many local markets, including in Portsmouth on Saturdays and Exeter on Thursdays. Please stop by!

  For folks who have a farm stand pickup there will be one more pickup after this weekend. Before long we'll have plants available for spring sales and we hope to have lettuce, roots and apples available in the stand through April. 

   Best, Greg

  This week's share:

    1 lb fingerling potatoes

    1 lb russet potatoes

    3 lbs carrots

    2 lbs parsnips

    1 lb watermelon radish

    1 lb beets

    2 butternut squash

    4 apples

    1 bag spinach

    1 bag lettuce mix

    

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